Podcasts

Brazilian Portuguese Podcast is back!

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Brazilian Portuguese Podcast is back and is now part of Really Learn Portuguese (reallylearnportuguese.com).

This website will still be available for a limited time but all new Podcasts and materials will be posted on our new URLhttp://reallylearnportuguese.com

Visit our new website and subscribe to our all new Podcast and Newsletter to get updates.

Best regards,

André Barbosa

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Category: Advanced, Beginner, Blog, Intermediate, Lessons, Level, News and updates, Notifications   |   Published: Jan. 20, 2016  

Brazilian Portuguese Podcast Closing -…

Dear listener,

We are sorry to inform you that BPP is closing its services soon. BPP associates have decided to take different directions on Brazilian Portuguese teaching and business.

We invite you to check out our other projects related to Portuguese language:

Talent Talen. Language institute in Holland specialized in Portuguese, English and Ductch. Also offering services for other languages upon consultation. Services include, among others, language teaching, document translations, corporate translations and general simultaneous translations. Web address: talenttalen.nl

The Portuguese hub. Website offering distinctive self-learning Brazilian Portuguese material and soon, virtual real time classes. Web address: theportuguesehub.com

BPP will be scheduled to go offline on the 31st of December of 2013. The website will be available, as well as all download links, until that date. We will not post any new materials, however we will provide support for all costumers until the last day.

We suggest that you download all material throughout the year of 2013.

If you have any questions contact us and please do check our new projects.

Best regards,

André Barbosa
andreippo@gmail.com

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Category: Notifications   |   Published: Oct. 20, 2012  

Learn Portuguese vocabulary about books

Minicast with vocabulary related to books. All the content of this minicast is below (Portuguese only):

Livro

 

Partes de um livro (físicas):

Capa [dura, macia/mole]

Páginas

Lombada (lateral)

Marcador

Abas

 

Mais vocabulário:

Editor

Autor

Edição

Prefácio

Capítulo

Bibliografia

 

Expressões com a palavra livro:

Não julgue um livro pela capa.

Eu sou um livro aberto.

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Category: Beginner, Intermediate, Lessons, Minicasts   |   Published: May. 18, 2012  

Important notification - March, 2012

Dear BPP listeners,

This is an Official notification, from March 4th, 2012.

Brazilian Portuguese Podcast will have to interrupt the production of new lessons for a while (we hope not much). For this reason we’ll cancel all on going paid subscriptions since we’re not posting materials on a timely basis for an indefinite time. We contacted all costumers in that situation, but if for any reason you’re a client and didn’t get the specific e-mail, contact us ASAP.

In the mean time you can buy all lessons’ extra materials for only 100USD, that’s a limited time offer.

BPP is proud of being one of the best websites providing digital Brazilian Portuguese lessons, and it’s part of our mission to be honest and fair with our clients. If you have any questions about this matter, don’t hesitate to contact us.

In this period BPP will re-structure its services and plan fresh new
innovative content. Continue subscribed to the free podcast and visiting our website. Although we’ll not keep on with paid timely subscriptions we’ll add more series/lesson packs to our store and free mini-lessons too.

We’re sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Also we encourage you to send us e-mails or comments on this post with suggestions for the website and the lessons. We want to make BPP better, more affordable and with an improved user experience.

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Category: Blog, Lessons, News and updates, Notifications   |   Published: Mar. 4, 2012  

Lesson - Ouro Preto

Culture

In this lesson you will learn about the beautiful city of Ouro Preto. You’ll also learn some vocabulary and grammar.

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Category: Beginner, Culture   |   Published: Oct. 29, 2011  

Lição - Estádio do Maracanã

Culture

In this lesson you will learn some interesting facts about Maracanã stadium. You’ll also learn some vocabulary and grammar.

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Category: Culture, Intermediate   |   Published: Oct. 8, 2011  

André's Minicast #2: Being polite in Brazil

Hello again. This is André’s Minicast for Brazilian Portuguese Podcast. How are you today? I hope you’re all fine and dandy.

Today I’ll give you some quick and dirty tips on how to be polite in Brazil as well as teaching you some basic vocab.

I’ll start by saying that, overall, Brazilians appreciate very much politeness, specially when people don’t know each other. Of course there are exceptions but let’s stick with what most people here expect.

So the first tip is saying thanks. Whenever someone does something in benefit of you even if you’re paying for a service we use to say thanks. Now, thanks in Portuguese is “obrigado” and if you want to be even politer you could say “muito obrigado” which means “thank you very much”. Men say obrigado, with a final “O”, “obrigadO”. Women say obrigada, with a final “A”, “obrigadA”.

And what if someone else thanks you? You should say “de nada”. This means “you’re welcome.”

Now another expression that comes in very handy is “com licença” which can pretty much be used like “excuse me”. So say it when you need to call someone’s attention, to ask for passage, to ask for permission to leave, to come in, to interrupt someone, etc.

And our last but not least expression is “desculpe-me” or “me desculpa”. Both expressions mean “I’m sorry”. The difference is that the first one is more formal and the second is more informal.

Now, “com licença”, I have to go. But before leaving I’d like to ask you to like us on Facebook: Our facebook page is facebook.com/brazilpod and follow us on twitter, our twitter name is brazilianpod. Also visit bestbpp.com and consider becoming a member. And if you enjoy our work please leave us a positive feedback on our iTunes page. Muito obrigado.

And remember if you have questions let us know and we’ll answer them here on the minicasts.

My name is André Barbosa and this is Brazilian Portuguese Podcast. Thanks for listening, até mais.

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Category: Beginner, Minicasts   |   Published: Sep. 22, 2011  

André's Minicast #1: Dor de cabeça

Hello everyone and welcome to André’s minicast # 1! This minicast is a part of Brazilian Portuguese Podcast. We thought of doing minicasts so that we could still offer high quality free content to our listeners and start interacting on the show. As this is my first minicast and I’m explaining how it’s going to work maybe it won’t be so “mini” but our goal is to talk about various subjects and teach some language within 3 – 4 minutes. We’ll try to to do minicasts for all levels and today we’ll have a beginner’s minicast.

So, I was wondering what I’d talk about in the debut episode but I just couldn’t think of any good ideas. I got so frustrated and I got a headache, and then the shining lamp showed up over my head. I’ll talk about headaches! Now, I know this isn’t the most interesting subject to talk about in the world, but still you’re about to learn some very useful vocabulary, idioms, and aspects of Portuguese language, so, bare with me. Let’s talk headaches.

Let’s begin, then, by learning how to say headache in Portuguese: Dor de cabeça, dor de cabeça, dor de cabeça. Nice! Now, I have a headache: Estou com dor de cabeça, estou com dor de cabeça, estou com dor de cabeça. Sweet! Notice that “estou com dor de cabeça” isn’t literally “I have a headache”. This is a matter of colocation, we simply use different elements in Portuguese and English to express the situation in which we feel a headache. The verb “estar” conjugated as “Simple present” – estou – can be shortened to: tô. Therefore, tô com dor de cabeça. It’s more informal and most people say it like that.

“Dor de cabeça” is an awfull pain, right? When we have it we can’t concentrate well, we get easily irritated and we can’t even enjoy the things we like most depending on how intense the pain is. So, what most people do is taking painkillers. Now, pain in Portuguese is “dor” and “killer” is “assassino”, so when you have a headache in Brazil you’ll take “assassinos de dor” right? WRONG! Even though it makes some sense, that sounds very weird in Brazilian Portuguese. Painkillers in Portuguese are “analgésicos”. Again, “analgésicos. In a drugstore you can say “Eu preciso de/quero um analgésico para dor de cabeça”. That means “I need/want a painkiller for headaches.” The word “analgesico” comes from the Greek language where a(n) means “contrary, opposite”, and “algesia” means suffering, pain. So, analgésico “means contrary to the pain”. You can also simply ask for “remédio para dor de cabeça” which means “medicine for headache”.
“Dor de cabeça” can also be used as an idiom, meaning “a very anoying situation, person, thing, etc.” Examples:
Meu vizinho é uma dor de cabeça, ele sempre escuta música bem alto até tarde.
My neighbour is a pain in the neck, he always listens to music very loudly ’til late at night.
Fazer negócios com aquele homem é uma dor de cabeça, ele é muito indeciso.
Doing business with that man is such a bother, he just can’t make his mind.

OK, I have to wrap up this episode, but before doing so I want to teach you two more things.

1. The technical term used by health professionals that refers to “dor de cabeça” is “cefaléia”, cefaléia. This word also came from the Greek language. “Cefal(o)” is a Greek word root that refers to the head, and éia (aia) refers to activity, in this case the activity is something causing the pain.

2. One of the worst types of “dor de cabeça” is migranes. In Portuguese there’s a cognate to it: “migrânea”, migrânea. And guess what!? It also comes from Greek language, the word in Greek is hêmikraníon, “metade do crânio”, that means “half of the skull”. So “migrânea” is an intense pain in the middle of the head. Another word that we use, and is actually more popular than migrânea, is enxaqueca, enxaqueca. Now this time the Greeks have nothing to do with it, this word came from the Arabic “as-saqiqa “ which is somehow related to pain or suffering.
And now I’ll answer a question that a listener called Mark left us on the comment page of lesson 248. As he asked in Portuguese I’ll also answer in Portuguese.

He asks:Tem uma diferenca entre “vou falar” e “irei falar” ?

The answer by our own Gisa Muniz: Ambos se referem a uma ação futura, só que “vou falar” é mais usado para um futuro mais próximo e na linguagem informal, é o equivalente à expressão “I’m going to talk”. E “irei falar’ e “falarei” são usados numa linguagem mais formal, siginificam “I will talk”.

If you have questions about Portuguese we’d love to answer them on the show. Send us an e-mail at contactus@brazilianportuguesepod.com
That’s it for today. Thanks for listening. Stay tuned on Brazilian Portuguese Podcast, more interesting content is coming soon.
My name is André Barbosa, and this was André’s BPP Minicast. See you soon.

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Category: Beginner, Minicasts   |   Published: Sep. 1, 2011  

Did you know these expressions of Brazilian Portuguese?

Armar um barraco

Literally: to pitch a handmade house

Means: to create a big confusion in public

Bater as botas

Literally: to beat the boots

Means: to die

Cara de pau

Literally: wooden face

Means: to be shameless, cheeky, insolent, cynical, have a poker face

Descascar o abacaxi

Literally: to peel the pineapple

Means: to solve a difficult problem

Encher linguiça

Literally: to fill the sausage

Means: to pad out (a text or speech), beat around the bush

How about creating a phrase with one of these expressions on the comments page?

by Karina Vernizzi 😀

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Category: Blog, Slangs and idioms   |   Published: Aug. 26, 2011  

Conversa Livre: Chá da tia Elaine e outras coisas.

Everyday Life

André, Elaine e Lorena conversam sobre o chá de gengibre e outras coisas relacionadas a uma alimentação “natureba” (o mais natural possível).

A transcrição e os arquivos extras serão postados em breve.

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Category: Advanced, Everyday Life, Fluent, Topics   |   Published: Jul. 18, 2011  

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Brazilian Portuguese Podcast is back and is now part of Really Learn Portuguese (reallylearnportuguese.com).

This website will still be available for a limited time but all new Podcasts and materials will be posted on our new URLhttp://reallylearnportuguese.com

Visit our new website and subscribe to our all new Podcast and Newsletter to get updates.

Best regards,

André Barbosa

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